BT Case Study
BT Case Study
BT Case Study
"UNUM is meant to be part of the world, and not a separate world. It rethinks what a headphone can be from the ground up. If a user wants to isolate themselves, they have many products available to them to do so. UNUM is meant to inspire a conversation around the future of audio and as such, takes a hard stance in the opposite direction to create a new type of product."
Adam Wrigley and Jung Soo Park, for Forbes
UNUM is meant to be part of the world, and not a separate world. It rethinks what a headphone can be from the ground up. If a user wants to isolate themselves, they have many products available to them to do so. UNUM is meant to inspire a conversation around the future of audio and as such, takes a hard stance in the opposite direction to create a new type of product.
Adam Wrigley and Jung Soo Park, for Forbes
frog worked with BT to completely redesign BT TV's ecosystem of products, transforming the experience, significantly increasing customer satisfaction ratings and winning numerous industry awards in the process.
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Satisfying Strategy
Competition within the pay-TV segment in the UK is fierce. Along with a desire to create a world-class TV service, BT made a strategic decision to redesign its TV experience from the ground up, partnering with frog to create something spectacular. Together they would make the BT TV product experience as engaging as the programming itself.
A User-Centered Approach
Research indicated that BT TV engagement amongst customers was low. This lead to increased dissatisfaction and a likelihood to turn away from the service. The fresh and inclusive redesign was conceived to appeal to users across BT TV's base, helping to make interaction with VOD services as instinctive using traditional TV channels. The result: a cohesive and intuitive experience across devices.
Net Promoters Soar
Following the relaunch of the BT TV service, measures of customer satisfaction improved dramatically. Net Promoter Score(NPS), a key customer loyalty metric, improved by 7 points, seeing an 11% drop in dissatisfied customers and a 7% drop in customers likely to leave BT TV.
A User-Centered Approach
Research indicated that BT TV engagement amongst customers was low. This lead to increased dissatisfaction and a likelihood to turn away from the service. The fresh and inclusive redesign was conceived to appeal to users across BT TV's base, helping to make interaction with VOD services as instinctive using traditional TV channels. The result: a cohesive and intuitive experience across devices.
BT Case Study
BT Case Study
BT Case Study
April 2017
BT TV wins the “Best Content Discovery Service” TV Connect Award
September 2017
BT TV wins the “Best interactive TV technology or application” CSI 2017 Award.
October 2017
BT TV wins the “Best interactive TV technology or application” CSI 2017 Award.
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We started with a question: What is the future of personal audio?
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We started with a question: What is the future of personal audio?
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We started with a question: What is the future of personal audio?
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BT Case Study
Example of the Design Chapter Assessment showing sample data
British Telecom continues to invest in the future of BT TV, routinely consulting customers and using data to drive product decisions, ensuring that customer-centricity remains its top priority.
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Our goal is to help visitors connect to the themes of the exhibition in playful, visceral way, while also encouraging them to see their everyday surroundings in a new light.” Says Neal Benezra, the Helen and Charles Schwab Director of SFMOMA. “On a deeper level, the Interpretive Gallery also serves as a reminder that artists have always been interested in breaking down the boundaries between natural and artificial realities—anticipating much of the work in VR and AR being done today.”

Inspired by the visual puns and paradoxes found in Magritte’s works from this period, the Magritte Interpretive Gallery presents a series of altered and augmented “windows.” Each window invites visitors to be “seen,” while simultaneously obstructing and alerting their perception of reality.

Some windows function as digital mirrors in which the visitors’ reflections do not behave as expected. Other windows sense visitors’ presence and open a gateway into another, augmented reality. The windows become both portals and problems, challenging expectations of what could and should be seen.

With the use of advanced, depth-sensing cameras and motion-tracking technology, the digital scenes in the windows draw on Magritte’s visual strategies. They also add a temporal twist, engaging the visitor in a brief journey by suspending and altering reality and perception. The combination of visual design and human-computer interaction creates a seamless experience activated by the presence of the visitor.

“We wanted to make the technology disappear as much as possible,” said Charles Yust, Principal Design Technologist and frog’s Project Lead. “There’s a mountain of coding, hardware integration, and software integration but all of that is in the service of creating a sense of ‘magic’. That’s what Magritte was achieving with just oil and canvas and we wanted to honour that while taking a modern-day approach.”

In the making of the Interpretive Gallery, frog worked with SFMOMA’s Curatorial, Digital, Marketing, Exhibitions, and Visitor Experience staff as well as content strategists, fabricators, and designers. Together, the team found a modern interpretation of “the real with the mystery that is in the real” that we think Magritte himself would have enjoyed.

“frog typically works in service of solving problems, answering questions or otherwise providing clarity for our clients,” said Oonie Chase, Executive Creative Director. “Working with SFMOMA, we had the rare chance to design in service of raising questions and to do so with Magritte, the undisputed master of visual enigmas. Working with SFMOMA is a dream project for frog; the way the museum is using technology to spur and expand engagement with art is incredibly inspiring.”